How the Pandemic Put a Lid on New Orleans’s Outdoor Drinking Culture

Few American cities can claim a bar and drinking culture as intertwined with their mythologies as New Orleans. The port city is a fabled destination for its expert boozing and “go-cups” — the beloved alcoholic beverage served in a to-go cup, available for purchase at most of the 1,400 establishments with liquor licenses in the city. Empowered by the ability to roam city streets cocktail in hand, visitors find themselves stopping in and out of bars, gathering around street performers, making new friends. By the end of a weekend, it may inspire a new sense of self-will in the visitor — “Why can’t I walk around with a drink as I please in my city?”



a group of people walking down the street: People stand outside of a French Quarter bar on March 16, the last day bars were fully open in New Orleans


© Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images
People stand outside of a French Quarter bar on March 16, the last day bars were fully open in New Orleans

But for a surreal few months, while cities

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Home Improvement Market Sees Surge During Pandemic

PALM BEACH,  Fla., Oct. 13, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Analysts expect home improvement spending to reach $439.9 billion in 2020 – In the time of a global pandemic, there is indeed no place like home. As millions of Americans practice social distancing while working and learning remotely, the home has become the focal point of our lives. The desire to make residences safer, more comfortable and more enjoyable has led to a home improvement boom.   Mentioned in today’s commentary includes:  NeoVolta (OTCQB: NEOV), Tesla (NASDAQ: TSLA), Home Depot (NYSE: HD) and Lowe’s (NYSE: LOW).

The Home Improvement Research Institute predicts Americans will spend $439.9 billion on home improvement products in 2020. The online home remodeling platform Houzz reports that demand for kitchen and bath remodeling was up 40% year over date in June 2020, while home additions increased 52% and fencing projects jumped 166%. Pool and hot tub installations

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Upcoming home improvement show at Expo Center to meet spike in projects during pandemic

ROYAL PALM BEACH — Taking advantage of this prolonged stretch at home to make some changes to your surroundings? 



a group of people standing in front of a store: The Expo Center at the South Florida Fairgrounds, seen here during an Antiques Festival in 2009, will play host to the Home Improvement and More Show on Oct. 23-25.


© Palm Beach Post File Photo
The Expo Center at the South Florida Fairgrounds, seen here during an Antiques Festival in 2009, will play host to the Home Improvement and More Show on Oct. 23-25.

You’re not alone, and the staff of the South Florida Fair wants to help.

The Home Improvement and More Show is Oct. 23-25 at the fairgrounds’ Expo Center, 9067 Southern Blvd. The event features more than 60 vendors across 35 categories related to home improvement, said Tim Pachis, corporate sales manager for the South Florida Fair.

More: No stickball in Wellington this year, but Wycliffe league has terrific plan for $60 dues

The show will be open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, Oct. 23 and Saturday, Oct. 24 and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday,

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Tulsa home remodeling company hiring crew members amid pandemic

TULSA, Okla. — Unemployment in Oklahoma decreases each week, but about 80,000 people are still without a job.

2 Works for You is highlighting a company that started small 42 years ago doing siding and windows. Now, as demand grew due to the coronavirus pandemic, business is booming.

Burnett Home Improvement said they used to make a few hundred thousand dollars a year, but hit company records this summer. Last month, they made nearly $700,000. They said the increase is because people are at home, restless, with no places to vacation.

So they’ve seen people spending extra funds on remodeling their home.

Vice President Shawn Donahue has been with the company for almost two years and wants to encourage people to apply. Their faith-based company prides itself on treatment and fairness.

Burnett Home Improvement employee Vasilik Napelenok said, “Most of the people are Christian here, so I think that’s really

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Parts of Charles Street to be closed to drivers to expand outdoor dining, shopping during pandemic

Portions of Charles Street is going to be closed on Saturday for a “pedestrian takeover,” allowing for expanded outdoor shopping and dining amid the coronavirus pandemic.

The Downtown Partnership of Baltimore helped orchestrate the “Charles Street Promenade” that closes portions of Charles Street from Saratoga Street to North Avenue from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.

People will be able to shop and eat at numerous places along the street including Brewers Art, Homeslyce, Mick O’Sheas, Aloha Sushi and Tapas Teatro, the partnership said in a news release. Mount Vernon Place will also offer free fitness classes.

Public health experts have said outdoor dining is safer than eating inside because of the lower risk of transmission for the coronavirus. Many Baltimore restaurants adjusted their operation to accommodate expanded outdoor dining in response to the pandemic. The move to close Charles Street to motorists is similar to strategy officials used in Fells

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Death of the HQ? Pandemic hits commercial real estate, but long-term trends still open to debate

A rendering of one of Amazon’s new buildings in Bellevue, Wash. (Vulcan Image)

“HQ’s are finished.”

That was the hot take this week from Chris Herd, founder and CEO of remote work setup startup Firstbase. After speaking with about 1,000 companies over the past six months, he estimates that many will be cutting their office space by as much as 40% to 60%. About 90% of workforces indicated that they “never want to be in an office again full-time,” he wrote.

The latest example of the trend is the news this morning that working from home will be a permanent part of the mix at Microsoft. Boosting access to talent, reducing costs, and quality of life were among the benefits of remote work cited by companies in Herd’s informal survey.

“Good thread on the future of work. I agree with him,” former Zillow Group CEO Spencer Rascoff chimed in

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South Jersey Real Estate Investment Firm Closes on Cash Out Refinance Amidst Pandemic

HADDONFIELD, N.J., Oct. 8, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Darwin Capital Management Group of South Jersey has closed on the refinance of a significant portion of its real estate holdings, all of which are rental properties located in the Southern New Jersey submarket.  The closing of the refinance occurred on Wednesday September 30, 2020.

A South Jersey Community Bank provided the financing in the form of a $3,000,000 first lien position loan on all of the assets.

Darwin Capital Management Group cashed out over a Million Dollars in the refinance and will immediately use the capital to acquire new assets as it plans to expand its business significantly in the calendar year 2021.

“The closing of this transaction represents a pivotal point in my company’s growth path,” said Adam Cohen, Managing Partner of Darwin Capital Management Group. “This infusion of liquidity allows us to further execute on our business

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The Pandemic Sparks a Real-Estate Gold Rush in Upstate New York

Shaniqua Juliano

In her late-career novel “Hudson River Bracketed,” Edith Wharton memorialized the landscape just north of New York City—the “precipitate plunge of many-tinted forest, the great sweep of the Hudson, and the cliffs on its other shore.” In Wharton’s time, upstate was where Manhattan’s wealthy migrated seasonally, taking trains to enormous homes like Wyndcliffe, in Rhinebeck—the stolid mansion of Wharton’s aunt, Elizabeth Schermerhorn Jones, which is said to be the source of the phrase “keeping up with the Joneses”—or the Mills family’s sixty-five-room Staatsburgh mansion, designed by McKim, Mead, and White and thought to be the inspiration for Bellomont in “The House of Mirth.” If they didn’t decamp to Beaux-Arts piles, they sought “the elaborate rusticity of an Adirondack camp,” as Wharton put it in that novel. For the gentry, leaving the city was practically compulsory, she wrote in “The Custom of the Country”: “In the early summer New York was

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Is Home Depot a Safe Bet During the Pandemic?

Shaniqua Juliano

With fiscal second-quarter sales growth of 23.4%, it’s safe to say Home Depot (NYSE:HD) has performed quite well during the coronavirus pandemic. As an essential business, the home improvement behemoth was able to keep its doors open to serve the needs of millions of shoppers.

Its stock price has risen 30% so far this year, driven by impressive results from the do-it-yourself (DIY) segment. But for Home Depot to position itself for long-term success, its Pro business is the key.

Pandemic-fueled growth

From fiscal 2009 through fiscal 2019, Home Depot’s sales increased at a compound annual rate of 5.2%. The company has largely left its store growth unchanged with less than 50 net additions in that 10-year period, but management introduced initiatives like the One Home Depot strategy to boost efficiency within its existing store network. The company has reported positive comparable-sales growth for 10 years running.

Then, the coronavirus

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Sask. real estate market healthy despite COVID-19 pandemic

Shaniqua Juliano



a man wearing a suit and tie: Jason Yochim, CEO of the Saskatchewan Realtors Association


© Provided by Star Phoenix
Jason Yochim, CEO of the Saskatchewan Realtors Association

The Saskatchewan real estate market is showing “encouraging signs,” says Saskatchewan Realtors Association chief executive officer Jason Yochim.

While the market appears to be in recovery mode, all eyes are on whether the recent uptick will be sustainable.

“I’m cautiously optimistic,” Yochim said on Wednesday.

“It’s a good sign. I’d like to see this recovery. My only concern, I guess, would be what happens in the next six months when we see government funding maybe tapering off in the next few months, … just to see how the economy responds at this stage.”

For now, the Saskatchewan real estate market continues to chug along, outperforming last year’s market. Across the province, year-over-year sales were up almost 52 per cent compared to last September and more than 18.5 per cent year-to-date.

The median sale price was up more

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